Pages

Tuesday, May 29, 2012

Garden Tuesday: Azaleas!

It should be a great day in my garden.  Temps quite pleasant (65 up to 75), sunny, not very windy.  There is so much to do!  But first an update.

Remember the beautiful white flowers on the shrub in my backyard?



I saw the same plant at Home Depot a couple of weeks ago: azaleas!  I never, ever thought there would be azaleas in Omaha, Nebraska!  I'd always believed they were not hardy, and should only be planted in zone 7 or higher.  These are a mini version, obviously, and I've never seen plain bright white (just pink, peach or red), so I never thought of azaleas.  Furthermore, I know from my 16 years in Atlanta, that azaleas require high acid soil, which is why they do so well with pine mulch, and under pine trees there.  Mine are under a crabapple tree, which definitely does not produce high acid soil.  "I'm so confused!"  Every year, when the daffodils and grape hyacinth in the same flower bed die out, I'd been tying the leaves so that the soil gets more nitrogen.  Last year, however, I got lazy, and just cut them all back.  I'm wondering if that had something to do with the abundance of flowers this year.  Regardless, I now know what they are, and can take care of them better.

So today I finally have the time and energy to get out there.  The daisies have taken over my yard, so I have to pull those up before they sow.  Some late fall bloomers were left unattended amid the hassle of my life, and their debris needs to be addressed (yes, I know it's the end of May).  There are many weeds in one particular flower bed where I cut the shrubs back last year.   I'm going to be the Terminator.

Already there is much trimming to do.  The crabapple has encroached the territory of the retractable awning (which is fabric and very hard to clean, no matter what they claim).  The fruit is plentiful, and it needs to be pruned so the branches don't bow too much.  The purple leaf tree in the back is suffering from something, and the low dead branches need to be cut away (this is new since fall).  The spirea are huge already, but I think I'll wait to cut those back.  And the shrubs I cut way far back two falls ago (the "chainsaw incident") already need a good trimming.

DADGUMMIT!  I just looked out and saw a young bunny!  What happened to the neighbor's cat?!

Anyway.  The problem is that I need about another 10-20 bags of mulch.  That means a few trips with my little sedan, and an extra $25-50.  But it'll be worth it.  We just won't eat much this month.  (Actually, with one teen gone for three weeks, that's entirely probable.)

So I'm off to Westlake Ace to fill up my trunk with another 7 bags of mulch, then out to the backyard to get some exercise.  This means I don't have to work out today, right?

Share your garden pics and enjoy the others at  Garden Tuesday, and Garden Party and Bloomin' Tuesday.

10 comments:

  1. They are discovering new species of azaleas all the time. The foliage on your plant is not distinctively azalea, but the new types, and ones that grow in your area, must be different. It is certainly a beauty--and does it have a fragrance?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, I posted previously. "The flowers smell fragrant, but not sweet."

      Delete
  2. I love my azaleas! Thanks for linking up!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This comment has been removed by the author.

      Delete
  3. The plant in the photo is very pretty--a clean, crisp white against the dark green foliage. I have read that it's not a good idea to tie or braid bulb foliage after the bulbs stop blooming for the season, because it does hamper the bulbs from storing the energy they need for the upcoming growing season from the decaying leaves. Maybe this had something to do with your resurgence of flowers this year?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Actually, the opposite is true. Daffodils are best tied so that they put nutrients back into the soil that helps them bloom the next year. This is for climates with four seasons, of course. That has been my experience, too, and this year the daffodil blooms were small and pitiful. The azaleas, though, were most plentiful I've seen since we've been here. See the original post: http://my-omaha-garden.blogspot.com/2012/05/garden-tuesday-spring-flora.html

      Delete
  4. I just moved here from a town in Texas where the azaleas are famous: Tyler, Texas.
    Brenda

    ReplyDelete
  5. hope you got all your mulch! lovely little azelea, they grow abundant here in oregon! enjoyed your blog!

    debbie

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, debbie. I got 10 bags and drove home very slowly. I still need about 30 more, but they're going to have to wait. Where I was able to put it, the beds look awesome. And I only got about 1/3 of the daisies, because I waited till I was done with half of a bed, and didn't have much energy left. Today is a yukky day, and tomorrow it's supposed to rain all day. Friday I plan to pull those daisies!

      Delete
  6. Hey, can anyone help with the crabapple problem HERE ? I'd appreciate your taking a look.

    ReplyDelete